Narratives in Indian Textiles

I attended the conference Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth : Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. The ‘Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth’ conference was organized by Siyahi along with my colleagues from Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology. This was a three day conference in Jaipur, Rajasthan, wherein textile experts, writers, poets, musicians, performers, narrators, all came together with their diverse riches and variegated forms of story telling. This conference provided a forum for discussions, debate and interaction to focus on how essential and integral it is for us to protect and preserve our folk lore, literary traditions and the colours and threads of our culture.

Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Siyahi’s Mantles of Myth Narratives in Indian Textiles, 13 to 15 December 2008, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India


About Jaipur in Rajasthan:

Jaipur also popularly known as the Pink City, is the capital of Rajasthan state, India. Historically rendered as Jeypore. Founded in 1727 by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh, the ruler of Amber, the city today has a population of more than 5 million residents. The Palace quarter encloses a sprawling palace complex (the Hawa Mahal, or palace of winds), formal gardens, and a small lake. Nahargarh Fort crowns the hill in the northwest corner of the old city. Another noteworthy building is Sawai Jai Singh's observatory, Jantar Mantar.

The conference took place in Diggi Palace Hotel. Hotel Diggi Palace is an oasis in the heart of Rajasthan's famous Pink City of Jaipur. Surrounded by acres of beautifully manicured gardens, this converted haveli built in the 1860s is a haven of peace and tranquility located 5 minutes from the bustling Old Walled City.

According to Siyahi, Indian textile style has evolved with the development of civilization and its significance is hallowed by traditions. According to the Rig Veda and the Upanishads, the universe is a continuous fabric with a grid pattern upon which cycles of life are painted. In the Atharva Veda, day and night are said to spread light and darkness over the earth as weavers throw a shuttle on the loom.

Textiles with narratives are seen across the country and their range varies from painted and printed textiles to woven and embroidered pieces. These textiles tell us multiple stories and represent myths sacred to indigenous communities across the country. Many have religious and ritual value in the cultures they come from whereas others are folk and tribal textiles that carry narratives of their origins and legends of their ancestors and gods.

These textiles remind us of the riches of material culture in traditional communities and the wealth of accumulated knowledge which is generally ignored. They augment the existing rich verbal and oral literary traditions that record and map cultures. Understanding and translating these is a key element of the translating Bharat project. An understanding of the real India is possible only by fathoming its multiple histories in myriad tongues and forms.

See event website for latest details.
Website: http://www.siyahi.in